Editorial Policies

JNCHC

JNCHC Editorial Policy

Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council is a refereed periodical publishing scholarly articles on honors education. The journal uses a double-blind peer review process. Articles may include analyses of trends in teaching methodology, articles on interdisciplinary efforts, discussions of problems common to honors programs and colleges, items on the national higher education agenda, and presentations of emergent issues relevant to honors education. Submissions and inquiries should be directed to: Ada Long at adalong@uab.edu.

Deadlines

JNCHC is published semi-annually. Submission deadlines are March 1 and September 1.

JNCHC Submission Guidelines

We accept material by e-mail attachment in Word (not pdf). We do not accept material by fax or hard copy.

The documentation style can be whatever is appropriate to the author’s primary discipline or approach (MLA, APA, etc.), but please avoid footnotes. Internal citation to a list of references (bibliography) is strongly preferred, and the editor will revise all internal citations in accordance with MLA guidelines.

There are no minimum or maximum length requirements; the length should be dictated by the topic and its most effective presentation.

Accepted essays are edited for grammatical and typographical errors and for infelicities of style or presentation. Authors have ample opportunity to review and approve edited manuscripts before publication.

Submissions and inquiries s

JNCHC Editorial Board

Editors

Ada Long (English), Emeritus Professor of English and former Director of the University Honors Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Editorial Board

William A. Ashton (Psychology), Associate Professor, Behavioral Sciences Department, City University of New York at York College

Gary M. Bell (Early Modern British History), Dean of the University Honors College and Professor of History, Texas Tech University

Bernice Braid (Comparative Literature), Professor Emeritus of English, Director of Core Seminar, and Former University Honors Program Director, LIU Brooklyn

Phame Camarena (Human Development), Director of University Honors and Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, Central Michigan University

Joan Digby (English), Director of the Honors Program and Merit Fellowship, Professor of English, LIU Post

John W. Emert (Mathematical Sciences), Associate Dean of the Honors College and Professor of Mathematical Sciences, Ball State University

Ted Estess (English), Professor of English and Former Dean of the Honors College, University of Houston

Jim Ford (Philosophy/Religious Studies), Director of the Honors Program and Professor of Humanities, Rogers State University

Philip L. Frana (Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies), Associate Professor, Associate Director of the Honors Program and Co-Director of the Independent Scholars Program, James Madison University

Jay M. Freyman (Ancient Studies) Associate Professor Emeritus of Ancient Studies and Former Director of the Honors College, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Linda Frost (English), Professor of English and Dean of the Honors College, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga

Raymond J. Green (Psychology), Dean of the Honors College and Professor of Psychology, Texas A&M University-Commerce

Jerry Herron (English), Dean of the Irvin D. Reid Honors College and Professor of English, Wayne State University

Nancy Davis Johnson (Psychology), Associate Professor of Psychology, Queens University of Charlotte

Lisa W. Kay (Statistics), Associate Professor and Former Associate Director of the Honors Program, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Eastern Kentucky University

John Korstad (Biology), Professor of Biology and Honors Program Networking Director, Oral Roberts University

George Mariz (History), Emeritus Professor of History and Emeritus Director of the Honors Program, Western Washington University

David N. Mowry (Philosophy), SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor, Honors Program
Founding Director Emeritus, Plattsburgh State University

Rosalie Otero (English), Professor Emerita and Former Honors Director, University of New Mexico

Anne Ponder (English), Senior Consultant with the Association of Governing Boards and Chancellor Emerita, UNC Asheville

Jeffrey A. Portnoy (English), Associate Dean of the Honors College and Professor of English, Perimeter College, Georgia State University

Rae Rosenthal (English), Director of the Honors Program and Professor of English, Community

College of Baltimore County Essex Campus

Rusty Rushton (English), Associate Director of the University Honors Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Ricki J. Shine (American History), Associate Director of the Calhoun Honors College and Director of

Major Fellowships, Clemson University

Stephen H. Wainscott (Political Science), Director Emeritus of the Calhoun Honors College, Clemson University

Len Zane (Physics), Emeritus Professor of Physics and Former Dean of the Honors College, University of Nevada, Las Vegasand Former Dean of the Honors College, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

NCHC Style Sheet

Instead of providing an abstract, make sure your introduction gives a clear sense of your topic and thesis.

Your submission should center on an idea, not just description or information, and, starting in your introduction, you should be clear about why and how your thesis is relevant, interesting, and useful to an audience of honors administrators, faculty, and/or staff.

Your conclusion should explore the implications of your thesis rather than simply repeating it.

Don’t forget that you need to tie your topic to honors in a specific way.

Avoid blanket assumptions that cannot be backed up with evidence (and thus are often wrong), e.g., “few community colleges have honors programs” or “few honors programs practice outcomes assessment.”

Similarly, be wary of statements like “Little has been written about”; chances are that a lot has been written about it, and you’re obliged to have done that research. Thanks to Jeff Portnoy, NCHC has made such research incredibly easy in relation to honors publications: go to http://nchchonors.org/public-press/biblio... and do a key word search on your topic. The journals and monographs are available online at http://nchchonors.org/nchc-publications/.

Avoid constructions like “This paper will present research on” or “We intend to show that.” Go ahead and make statements about your topic.

Avoid rhetorical questions. Make statements instead.

Avoid redundancy. Repetition for emphasis is unnecessary if you make your point well the first time.

Use active voice whenever possible. “We found that” is better than “It was found that.”

Avoid starting a sentence with a phrase like “There is” or “It is.” “There is a common belief that” can and should be “A common belief is that.”

If you use italics for emphasis or scare quotes, we will almost always remove them.

Capitalization is absurdly fraught, but “honors program” is capitalized ONLY when it is part of the official title of a program, e.g., “Washington State University Honors Program” but “the honors program at Washington State University.” Similarly, titles and disciplines are capitalized only when part of a formal title, e.g., “Anna is Associate Professor of Philosophy” but “Anna is an associate professor of philosophy.”

Generally avoid contractions, slang, clichés, and other forms of casual writing; formality is appropriate in a journal essay except in rare cases when informality is a strategic choice.

Every rule is made to be broken—but only by outstanding writers.

HIP

HIP Editorial Policy

Honors in Practice (HIP) publishes articles about innovative practices in individual honors programs and nuts-and-bolts issues of concern to the members of the National Collegiate Honors Council. HIP employs a double-blind peer review system. Essays should present ideas and/or practices that will be useful to other honors administrators and faculty, not just descriptions of “what we do at our institution.” Essays should advance a thesis located within a larger context such as theoretical perspectives, trends in higher education, or historical background. Essays should also demonstrate an awareness of previous honors discussions of the topic.

Submissions and inquiries should be directed to Ada Long at adalong@uab.edu.

HIP Deadline

HIP is published annually. The deadline for submissions is January 1.

Submission Guidelines

We accept material by e-mail attachment in Word (not pdf). We do not accept material by fax or hard copy.

If documentation is used, the documentation style can be whatever is appropriate to the author’s primary discipline or approach (MLA, APA, etc.), but please avoid footnotes. Internal citation to a list of references (bibliography) is strongly preferred, and the editor will revise all internal citations in accordance with MLA guidelines.

There are no minimum or maximum length requirements; the length should be dictated by the topic and its most effective presentation.

Accepted essays are edited for grammatical and typographical errors and for infelicities of style or presentation. Authors have ample opportunity to review and approve edited manuscripts before publication.

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to Ada Long at adalong@uab.edu or, if necessary, 850.927.3776.

HIP Editorial Board

Editors

Ada Long (English), Emerita Professor of English and former Director of the University Honors Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Members

Larry Andrews (Comparative Literature), Dean Emeritus of the Honors College and Professor Emeritus, English, Kent State University

Richard Badenhausen (English), Professor, Kim T. Adamson Chair, and Director of the Honors Program, Westminster College

J. Robert Baker (English), Professor of English and Director of the Honors Program, Fairmont State University

James D. Bell (Entrepreneurship), Professor of Management, Texas State University

Kate Bruce (Psychology), Professor of Psychology and Director of the Honors Scholars College, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Scott Carnicom (Psychology), Dean of the College of Natural, Behavioral, and Health Sciences and Professor of Psychology, Lock Haven University

James J. Clauss (Classics), Professor of Classics and Former Honors Director, University of Washington

Heather Camp (English), Associate Professor of English, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Lisa L. Coleman (English), Professor of English and Honors Program Director, Southeastern Oklahoma State University

Leslie A. Donovan (English), Professor of Honors College and Affiliated Faculty of English and Medieval Studies, University of New Mexico

Steven Engel (Political Science), Director of the University Honors Program and Associate Professor of Political Science, Georgia Southern University

Bruce E. Fox (Forestry), Professor of Forest Management, Northern Arizona University

Annmarie Guzy (English), Associate Professor of English, University of South Alabama

Carolyn Haynes (English), Professor of English and Associate Provost, Miami University

Melissa L. Johnson (Educational Technology), Associate Director of the Honors Program, University of Florida

Jim Lacey (American Studies), Emeritus Director of the University Honors Program and Professor of English, Eastern Connecticut State University

Karen Lyons (English, Women’s and Gender Studies), Courtesy Assistant Professor of English, Emeritus; Associate Director, University Honors Program, Retired

Virginia McCombs (History), Former Director of the University Honors Program and Professor Emerita of History, Oklahoma City University

Niles Reddick (Humanities), Vice Provost, University of Memphis Lambuth Campus

Michael Sloane (Psychology), Director of the University Honors Program and Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Bob Spurrier (Political Science), Director Emeritus of the Honors College and Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Oklahoma State University

Paul R. Strom (Ethics), Honors Residential Academic Program Faculty, University of Colorado Boulder

Emily Walshe (Library and Information Science), Reference Librarian and Associate Professor of University Libraries, Long Island University

Norm Weiner (Sociology), Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Director Emeritus of the College Honors Program, State University of New York at Oswego

Susan Yager (English), Professor and Faculty Director of the Honors Program, Iowa State University

John Zubizarreta (English), Professor of English and Director of Honors and Faculty Development, Columbia College

NCHC Style Sheet

Instead of providing an abstract, make sure your introduction gives a clear sense of your topic and thesis.

Your submission should center on an idea, not just description or information, and, starting in your introduction, you should be clear about why and how your thesis is relevant, interesting, and useful to an audience of honors administrators, faculty, and/or staff.

Your conclusion should explore the implications of your thesis rather than simply repeating it.

Don’t forget that you need to tie your topic to honors in a specific way.

Avoid blanket assumptions that cannot be backed up with evidence (and thus are often wrong), e.g., “few community colleges have honors programs” or “few honors programs practice outcomes assessment.”

Similarly, be wary of statements like “Little has been written about”; chances are that a lot has been written about it, and you’re obliged to have done that research. Thanks to Jeff Portnoy, NCHC has made such research incredibly easy in relation to honors publications: go to http://nchchonors.org/public-press/biblio... and do a key word search on your topic. The journals and monographs are available online at http://nchchonors.org/nchc-publications/.

Avoid constructions like “This paper will present research on” or “We intend to show that.” Go ahead and make statements about your topic.

Avoid rhetorical questions. Make statements instead.

Avoid redundancy. Repetition for emphasis is unnecessary if you make your point well the first time.

Use active voice whenever possible. “We found that” is better than “It was found that.”

Avoid starting a sentence with a phrase like “There is” or “It is.” “There is a common belief that” can and should be “A common belief is that.”

If you use italics for emphasis or scare quotes, we will almost always remove them.

Capitalization is absurdly fraught, but “honors program” is capitalized ONLY when it is part of the official title of a program, e.g., “Washington State University Honors Program” but “the honors program at Washington State University.” Similarly, titles and disciplines are capitalized only when part of a formal title, e.g., “Anna is Associate Professor of Philosophy” but “Anna is an associate professor of philosophy.”

Generally avoid contractions, slang, clichés, and other forms of casual writing; formality is appropriate in a journal essay except in rare cases when informality is a strategic choice.

Every rule is made to be broken—but only by outstanding writers.